Celebrating Indigenous Female Activists and Leaders

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This above artwork is based on photographs from online public domains. La Vie de la Rose does not claim ownership of these photographs and no copyright infringement is intended. La Vie de la Rose is not claiming that women featured in this newsletter in anyway endorse or support our flower essences. 

Just as the saying goes:

“Here’s to strong women. May we know them. May we be them.”

So many indigenous women are leading the fight for equality, environmental justice and peace. In light of Women’s History Month, we wanted to post an appreciation post for a few of such courageous and revolutionary women.

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Dr. Beatrice Medicine (Standing Rock Sioux):

Scholar, Anthropologist and Educator

Dr. Medicine was one of the most prominent Native American female anthropologists. Her research focused on Indigenous language, history and culture. She was also one of the first researchers to focus on Indigenous women. Through her research and writing, she reframed the narrative around Native American women. She is also deeply involved in education and advocacy.  
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Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne and Hodulgee Muscogee):
Policy Advocate, Author and Lecturer

Harjo dedicated the past 5 decades on advocating for Native American rights. She served as the congressional liaison on Indian Affairs for President Jimmy Carter. She has been vital in the development and passing of critical legislations including the American Indian Religious Freedom Act (1978) and more. As the central figure in advocacy for issues of the Native People, Harjo’s contributions and achievements goes far beyond what we can cover here. In 2014, she was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Barack Obama. 
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Winona LaDuke (White Earth Ojibwe)
Activist, Economist, Author and Politician

LaDuke started her activism young, addressing the UN at 18 and engaged in advocacy throughout her time at Harvard. After graduation, LaDuke moved back to White Earth Reservation where she supported legal actions to recover Ojibwe People’s lands. While the lawsuit was not a success, LaDuke founded the White Earth Land Recovery Project. She has also founded the Indigenous Women’s Network and Honor the Earth. She has written extensively about feminism, environmental justice, Native American women, violence against Indigenous People and more. 
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LaDonna Brave Bull Allard (Standing Rock Sioux):
Activist and Historian

Founding the first resistance camp on her land, Allard is a leader in the movement against the Dakota Access Pipeline. We now know this movement as one of the most influential Indigenous rights movements. Allard also advocates around the world for the Indigenous ways of living that center around honoring the Earth.
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Elouise Cobell (Blackfeet):

Activist and banker

After years of collecting evidence and organizing plaintiffs, Cobell lead the class action lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Interior and the Department of the Treasury for mismanagement of Indian trust funds in 2009. A $3.4 billion settlement was approved by the U.S. government in 2010. Cobell then devoted herself to getting checks into the hands of the right people. She passed away in October 2011 though the work of distribution continued after her passing. In 2016, President Barack Obama awarded Cobell the Presidential Medal of Freedom which was accepted by her son, Turk Cobell, on her behalf. 
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